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Glossary of Terms Index

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Z

Glossary of Legal Terms - J

 

Joint Custody: An arrangement where parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

Joint Property: Property which is owned by two or more corporations or persons

Joint Tenancy: A way for two or more people to share ownership of property or other real estate. When two or more people own property as joint tenants and one owner dies, the other owners automatically own the deceased owner's share. Because of this right of survivorship, a will is not required to transfer the property; it goes directly to the surviving joint tenants without the delay and costs of probate.

Joint Work: A collaboration between two or more authors whereby their contributions are joined into a single cohesive work. Each of the authors of a joint work has equal rights to register and enforce the copyright, regardless of how their shares in the work are divided.

Judgement: A final court ruling resolving the key questions or disputes in a lawsuit which determines the rights and obligations of the opposing parties.

Jurisdiction: The extent of the authoritive power of the court to rule upon certain issues in certain areas.

Jurisprudence: The philosophy or science of law ; a sytem of laws.

Juror: A person who serves on a jury. Lists of potential jurors are obtained from sources such as electoral rolls and department of motor vehicles' lists. Employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees who are called for jury duty--that is, they cannot demote or fire an employee for serving.

Jury: A group of people who are selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, a jury is made up of 12 people who have to arrive at a unanimous decision.

Justice of the Peace: A community member whose duties include: administering oaths, take statutory declarations and affirmations.

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